Patient Stories

Ask the Expert: Are You at Risk for a Urinary Tract Infection?

Posted on Jul 27, 2015

drlynne-103

Jonathan Lynne, M.D., MPH, Family Medicine, Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation

Q: I’ve heard urinary tract infections (UTIs) are getting harder to treat. Why is this and who’s at risk of developing one?

Jonathan Lynne, M.D., MPH, answered:

UTIs are one of the most common infections doctors treat: More than half of women living in the United States will get a UTI. Urinary tract infections are caused by microorganisms—usually bacteria—that enter the urethra and bladder, causing inflammation and infection. UTIs are more common in women because women have a shorter urethra than men do. That means bacteria travel a shorter dAistance to a woman’s bladder. Read More

Sutter Health’s 2014 Year in Review

Posted on Jul 2, 2015

2014 Annual Report Photo

Our not-for-profit Sutter Health network invites you to explore our online 2014 annual report. Through videos and other interactive features, see how our doctors, hospitals and medical teams partner to provide top-rated, personalized care in diverse communities across Northern California. This year our annual report focuses on our:
Year in review
Community support
Generous donors
Financials
Sutter Health family
“At Sutter Health, we understand that in a rapidly changing world we must reimagine how we operate if we want to continue delivering the kind of quality care our patients expect and deserve,” said Sutter Health President and CEO Pat Fry. “In 2014, we implemented advanced technologies, pursued groundbreaking research, streamlined work processes and launched more convenient ways to access care.”

Ask An Expert About Endoscopic Ultrasound

Posted on Jun 1, 2015

Vinod K. Kurupath, M.D.

Vinod K. Kurupath, M.D.

Vinod K. Kurupath, M.D.

Gastroenterology

Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation

I have been diagnosed with a digestive disorder and I may be a candidate for an endoscopic ultrasound. What are the benefits of this procedure?

 In conventional endoscopy, the gastroenterologist can only view the innermost lining of the digestive tract. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allows a doctor to get very close to the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, liver and gallbladder and look beyond the inner layers. Read More

Ask An Expert About Nurse Practitioners

Posted on Apr 27, 2015

Sarah Noble, MSN, FNP

Sarah Noble, MSN, FNP

Sarah Noble, MSN, FNP

Nurse Practitioner, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation

Q: My Ob-Gyn’s office recently added a nurse practitioner. Can you tell me more about their qualifications and what they do?

A nurse practitioner is a registered nurse who has advanced education and training in the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic medical conditions, disease prevention and the promotion of health wellness.

Nurse practitioners must complete a master’s or doctoral degree and receive additional medical training beyond their initial training as a registered nurse. Read More

Ask an Expert About Heartburn and GERD

Posted on Mar 27, 2015

Wilson S. Tsai, M.D.

Wilson S. Tsai, M.D.

Wilson S. Tsai, M.D.

Medical director of esophageal and thoracic surgery

Sutter Health’s Eden Medical Center

Q: I take medication for my heartburn, but lately it isn’t as effective. Why do I keep getting heartburn and what else can I do to relieve the symptoms?

A: Imagine a room in your house is on fire and the alarm goes off, but instead of calling 911, you remove the batteries from the annoying alarm.

Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who take medication to ease heartburn are essentially shutting down their bodies’ alarm system.

Drugs work great for symptom control, to decrease acidity in the stomach. But in many patients, they mask the real problem.

Serious complications can develop, from osteoporosis as a side-effect of long-term medication use to esophageal cancer, which is a growing epidemic in the United States.

GERD is a disease of anatomy. It’s important to have a full work-up from an esophageal specialist. That includes endoscopy, biopsy, measurement of the volume of reflux and an internal pressure test.

Depending on the results, surgery may be an option. Implantation of a LINX® magnetic ring is a minimally invasive surgery I often perform. The ring is designed to augment the weak lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to help prevent acid and bile reflux from the stomach into the esophagus.

How LINX® works

  • A small, flexible band of magnets is enclosed in titanium beads. Titanium wires connect the beads.
  • The magnetic attraction between the beads is designed to help keep the weak LES closed to prevent reflux.
  • The movement of swallowing temporarily breaks the magnetic bond, allowing food and liquid to pass into the stomach.
  • Magnetic attraction closes the LES after swallowing to reinforce the body’s natural barrier to reflux.

Signs of GERD

 

You may be suffering from GERD if you have any of these symptoms:

  • Trouble swallowing starchy foods, which stick in the esophagus, turning into sticky goo that traps other food.
  • Painful esophageal spasms that can mimic a heart attack.
  • Abdominal pain while exercising; workouts can put pressure on the abdomen, causing pain and discomfort.
  • Occasional difficulty breathing. Reflux can be breathed into the lungs.

 

Click here to learn more about GERD and LINX®.

 

 

 

Beyond Heartburn: Addressing the Cause of GERD

Posted on Dec 3, 2014

Work Out in Comfort

Work out in comfort.

Imagine a room in your house is on fire and the alarm goes off, but instead of calling 911, you remove the batteries from the annoying alarm.

Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who take medication to ease heartburn are essentially shutting down their bodies’ alarm system, says Wilson S. Tsai, M.D., medical director of esophageal and thoracic surgery at Sutter Health’s Eden Medical Center.

“Drugs work great for symptom control, to decrease acidity in the stomach. But in many patients, they mask the real problem,” says Tsai. Read More