Ask An Expert About Nurse Practitioners

Posted on Apr 27, 2015

Sarah Noble, MSN, FNP

Sarah Noble, MSN, FNP

Sarah Noble, MSN, FNP

Nurse Practitioner, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation

Q: My Ob-Gyn’s office recently added a nurse practitioner. Can you tell me more about their qualifications and what they do?

A nurse practitioner is a registered nurse who has advanced education and training in the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic medical conditions, disease prevention and the promotion of health wellness.

Nurse practitioners must complete a master’s or doctoral degree and receive additional medical training beyond their initial training as a registered nurse. Read More

Leading Edge HPV Research Includes Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation

Posted on Apr 23, 2015

Jill Foley, M.D.

Jill Foley, M.D.

Sutter Eat Bay Medical Foundation and our patients are part of groundbreaking public health public health surveillance program into the effectiveness of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines.

By monitoring trends in the occurrence of HPV types associated with precancerous lesions, the project helps researchers understand the impact of HPV vaccines on these lesions and other HPV related diseases.

“We are proud to contribute to the evidence that is demonstrating the effectiveness of HPV vaccines against HPV types most commonly associated with precancerous cervical lesions,” says Jill Foley, M.D., SEBMF OB-GYN Department chair. Read More

Free Wig, Support for Cancer Patients Experiencing Hair Loss

Posted on Apr 23, 2015

Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Comprehensive Cancer Center now offers a free wig and American Cancer Society consultation for women losing hair during cancer treatment.

Alta Bates Summit’s Comprehensive Cancer Center and the American Cancer Society support women during cancer treatment.

Alta Bates Summit Comprehensive Cancer Center now offers a free wig and American Cancer Society consultation for women losing hair during cancer treatment.

The wig bank is staffed by specially trained volunteers at the cancer center, 2001 Dwight Way in Berkeley. Call 1-800-227-2345 for an appointment.

“This is the first onsite American Cancer Society wig bank at a Sutter Health facility in the East Bay,” says Luanne Ridgley, LCSW, manager of oncology supportive care services for the cancer center. “It’s a great resource for anyone in the community, not just Sutter patients.”

One-on-one consultations include:

  • One free wig per patient
  • Finding a wig that fits your lifestyle
  • Suggestions for wearing wigs, turbans and scarves

 

Summit Campus Asthma Resource Center Open

Posted on Apr 13, 2015

Roshenara smallWith the addition of a Summit campus location, Sutter Health’s East Bay region now has three resource centers improving treatment for asthma patients and reducing their need for Emergency Department visits and hospital stays.

After treatment in one of our EDs, patients with an asthma diagnoses who don’t have their own physician or medical insurance or those with MediCal are invited to meet with an asthma educator. Patients get support managing the chronic disease and to find ongoing care in the community.

“Patients are very thankful,” says respiratory therapist Roshenara Moore, who leads the center. “They appreciate that someone cares.”

Read More

Cheers for Sutter Health Volunteers

Posted on Apr 13, 2015

Cheers for Sutter Health Volunteers“The world is hugged by the faithful arms of volunteers.”Terri Guillemets

April 12 marks the beginning of National Volunteer Week—a special time to recognize all those who give back to the community by generously contributing their skills and experience to make a positive difference.

Throughout our Sutter Health care centers, about 5,000 volunteers donate their time to help us create an environment where patients feel respected, valued and understood. From greeting visitors and answering their questions to helping families in Emergency Rooms, our volunteers share our commitment to giving patients an exceptional, personalized care experience, every time.

In honor of National Volunteer Week, “I want to personally thank our volunteers for their daily partnership with us, our patients and their families, ” says Pat Fry, Sutter Health President and CEO. “They’ve chosen to volunteer within Sutter Health because they believe in us and the work we do.”

 

Urgent Care Clinic in Berkeley

Posted on Mar 30, 2015

2500 MilviaThe Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation care center at 2500 Milvia Street includes Sutter’s first Urgent Care clinic in Berkeley.

“The facility is designed with the patient in mind. We offer robust primary care and ob-gyn services and introduce urgent care to the community,” says Samuel Santoro, D.O., president of the East Bay Physicians Medical Group.

The 28,000-square-foot building has been completely remodeled to accommodate 19 OB-Gyns, four pediatricians and four family medicine doctors from offices elsewhere in Berkeley.

Building highlights include:

  • Urgent Care open 5-9p.m. Monday through Friday and 10a.m.-2 p.m. weekends and holidays.
  • Convenient, plentiful free parking
  • Streamlined registration
  • Spacious rooms
  • Shared clinical/staff work space

 

Ask an Expert About Heartburn and GERD

Posted on Mar 27, 2015

Wilson S. Tsai, M.D.

Wilson S. Tsai, M.D.

Wilson S. Tsai, M.D.

Medical director of esophageal and thoracic surgery

Sutter Health’s Eden Medical Center

Q: I take medication for my heartburn, but lately it isn’t as effective. Why do I keep getting heartburn and what else can I do to relieve the symptoms?

A: Imagine a room in your house is on fire and the alarm goes off, but instead of calling 911, you remove the batteries from the annoying alarm.

Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who take medication to ease heartburn are essentially shutting down their bodies’ alarm system.

Drugs work great for symptom control, to decrease acidity in the stomach. But in many patients, they mask the real problem.

Serious complications can develop, from osteoporosis as a side-effect of long-term medication use to esophageal cancer, which is a growing epidemic in the United States.

GERD is a disease of anatomy. It’s important to have a full work-up from an esophageal specialist. That includes endoscopy, biopsy, measurement of the volume of reflux and an internal pressure test.

Depending on the results, surgery may be an option. Implantation of a LINX® magnetic ring is a minimally invasive surgery I often perform. The ring is designed to augment the weak lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to help prevent acid and bile reflux from the stomach into the esophagus.

How LINX® works

  • A small, flexible band of magnets is enclosed in titanium beads. Titanium wires connect the beads.
  • The magnetic attraction between the beads is designed to help keep the weak LES closed to prevent reflux.
  • The movement of swallowing temporarily breaks the magnetic bond, allowing food and liquid to pass into the stomach.
  • Magnetic attraction closes the LES after swallowing to reinforce the body’s natural barrier to reflux.

Signs of GERD

 

You may be suffering from GERD if you have any of these symptoms:

  • Trouble swallowing starchy foods, which stick in the esophagus, turning into sticky goo that traps other food.
  • Painful esophageal spasms that can mimic a heart attack.
  • Abdominal pain while exercising; workouts can put pressure on the abdomen, causing pain and discomfort.
  • Occasional difficulty breathing. Reflux can be breathed into the lungs.

 

Click here to learn more about GERD and LINX®.